Illustrators #11 (magazine review).

August 16, 2016 | By | Reply More
All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd (c) The Book Palace

All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd
(c) The Book Palace

To stop me getting withdrawal symptoms after reading and reviewing ‘Illustrators’ twice a month, I decided to read the last of the back issues to this month. If you’ve been picking up these issues as well, we aren’t too far from the release of the new issue.

All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd (c) The Book Palace

All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd
(c) The Book Palace

With Illustrators # 11, we start with a look at the work of Donato Giancola, an American artist who is seen more on his side of the pond than over here. The fact that he can paint fantasy and Science Fiction with a different palate of colours, depending on the subject matter, will have you marvelling at his skill. There are even some examples showing how he goes from sketch to final painting, so you have your own learning curve. I’m more amazed none of the artbook publishers haven’t gotten a book of his work or how-tos together yet.

All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd (c) The Book Palace

All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd
(c) The Book Palace

Tomer Hanuka’s art is more comicbook like and uses a more limited palate but still conveys what he wants you to see. For those of you who are at home with pen and ink, you’ll definitely learn a few tricks by studying his work and seeing how a little colour can covey such emotions. Hanuka has also done some poster work, presenting the likes of Hitchcock and Kubrick in a different way.

All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd (c) The Book Palace

All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd
(c) The Book Palace

The real jaw-dropper isn’t actually in our genre but that of American born artist James McConnell (1901-1995) who painted many of the pulp detective, western and historical books from the 1950s-60s, often painting one and doing a preliminary for the next in the same day, such was his work in demand by several publishing houses. When he neared retirement, he went on to paint for ‘Look And Learn’ magazine. His attention to detail, depending on requirement, really is staggering and how many of these artists have ever had a show at The Association Of Illustrators Gallery in London in 1976? I should point out this was instigated by the publisher Corgi art director John Munday who came across the originals of McConnell’s work at his office.

All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd (c) The Book Palace

All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd
(c) The Book Palace

There is an interview with artist Mike Terry whose forte his comedic art and caricature and for that, I’ll let his art do the speaking.

All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd (c) The Book Palace

All contents copyright The Book Palace Ltd
(c) The Book Palace

Finally, a brief look at Freya Hartas who looks like she is going to have an interesting time illustrating children’s books.

During the couple days I took reading this edition of ‘Illustrators’, I impulsively did a few sketches again which shows how these books stimulate the brain. Even if you can’t draw or paint, then you’ll just love what these magazines offer with the variety of artists, many of whom you might have seen their work but never had a name to put to. Can’t wait for the next issue.

GF Willmetts

July 2016

(pub: The Book Palace, 2015. 98 page illustrated squarebound magazine. Price: £18.00 (UK), $21.99 (US). ISBN: 978-1-907081-28-6. ISSN: 2052-6520)

check out website: www.thebookpalace.com

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Category: Illustration, Magazines

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About the Author ()

Geoff Willmetts has been editor at SFCrowsnest for some 15 plus years now, showing a versatility and knowledge in not only Science Fiction, but also the sciences and arts, all of which has been displayed here through editorials, reviews, articles and stories. With the latter, he has been running a short story series under the title of ‘Psi-Kicks’ If you want to contribute to SFCrowsnest, read the guidelines and show him what you can do. If it isn’t usable, he spends as much time telling you what the problems is as he would with material he accepts. This is largely how he got called an Uncle, as in Dutch Uncle. He’s not actually Dutch but hails from the west country in the UK.

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