RSSCategory: GENRE

Lost Girl by Adam Nevill (book review).

May 28, 2017 | By | Reply More
Lost Girl by Adam Nevill (book review).

Adam Nevill is a British writer of supernatural horror who has so far published eight novels and a collection of short stories. Given that most of his work falls into the horror genre, ‘Lost Girl’ (2015) is a bit of a departure as it’s a near future dystopian thriller. The story is set in the […]

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The Encyclopaedia Of Fantasy & Science Fiction Art Techniques by John Grant and Ron Tiner (book review).

May 27, 2017 | By | Reply More
The Encyclopaedia Of Fantasy & Science Fiction Art Techniques by John Grant and Ron Tiner (book review).

Catching up on my backlog of artbooks, I have ‘The Encyclopaedia Of Fantasy & Science Fiction Art Techniques’ by John Grant and Ron Tiner. Although just over 20 years since release, the information it covers is still relevant and I’m surprised hasn’t been reprinted, although considering that on the long river bookshop there is a […]

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Science Fiction And Empire by Patricia Kerslake (book review).

May 27, 2017 | By | Reply More
Science Fiction And Empire by Patricia Kerslake (book review).

I have to admit to a raised eyebrow at Patricia Kerslake’s book, ‘Science Fiction And Empire’, when I saw its retail price. If you’re anything like me, even with old books, when I see extreme prices, especially for old books, I give a sigh, shrug and carry on with my life. As a reviewer – […]

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People Of The Sun by Jason Parent (book review).

May 27, 2017 | By | Reply More
People Of The Sun by Jason Parent (book review).

‘People Of The Sun’ by Jason Parent tells the story of four aliens from Symoria. They are part of a desperate mission to travel to another world to find food. Their world is dying with most of the available food consumed and their civilisation just an echo of what it once was. Sending a spaceship […]

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Dinnusos Rises by Tej Turner (book review).

May 26, 2017 | By | Reply More
Dinnusos Rises by Tej Turner (book review).

Dinnusos Rises is a new club in town, gathering place for the fringes of society. Artistic types flock there to enjoy the murals and enjoy the haunting melodies of the house band, Sunset Haze. The political group Taxus Baccata is gaining followers and many of the club’s patrons find themselves caught up in their growing […]

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Lost Souls (Reviver trilogy book 2) by Seth Patrick (book review).

May 26, 2017 | By | Reply More
Lost Souls (Reviver trilogy book 2) by Seth Patrick (book review).

In the last 12 months, the Afterlifers have discovered new funding and started making life difficult for revivers like Jonah to do their job: briefly waking the dead for a final goodbye or to help police catch their killers. Jonah is fed up with the hassle, still having nightmares about the Michael Andreas incident and […]

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Illustrators #18 (magazine review).

May 26, 2017 | By | Reply More
Illustrators #18 (magazine review).

My usual page flick of the latest issue of ‘Illustrators’ quickly revealed that it this isn’t a normal edition. If anything, it’s darn right cartoony. Hardly surprising when the opener is ‘Mad’ caricature artist Mort Drucker. Over the years, you’ve probably seen his art but not put a name to his drew them. Drucker was […]

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When gravity falls: with ‘orphan memory’.

May 25, 2017 | By | Reply More
When gravity falls: with ‘orphan memory’.

Monash University researchers have identified a new concept – ‘orphan memory’ – which changes the current thinking around gravitational waves. The research, by the Monash Centre for Astrophysics, was published recently in Physical Review Letters. Einstein’s theory of general relativity predicts that cataclysmic cosmic explosions stretch the fabric of spacetime. The stretching of spacetime is […]

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Jupiter: planet of weird wonder.

May 25, 2017 | By | Reply More
Jupiter: planet of weird wonder.

Early science results from NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter portray the largest planet in our solar system as a complex, gigantic, turbulent world, with Earth-sized polar cyclones, plunging storm systems that travel deep into the heart of the gas giant, and a mammoth, lumpy magnetic field that may indicate it was generated closer to the […]

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NASA Mercury: 1956 to 1963 by David Baker (book review).

May 25, 2017 | By | Reply More
NASA Mercury: 1956 to 1963 by David Baker (book review).

In many respects, I have always wondered why Haynes left a look at NASA’s Mercury Program until last of their space books. At least, I’m assuming it’s the last. Without these early space flights, none of the rest would have been possible. Back in the late 1950s and start of the 1960s, there were all […]

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